Earth as transiting planet

January 2019 featured a total lunar eclipse. The Moon dimmed by a factor of 20,000 (10.75 mag) during totality. Therefore, the light gathering capability of the 11.8 m Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) in Arizona was needed for the observations. Additionally, the high spectral resolution of the Potsdam Echelle Polarimetric and Spectroscopic Instrument (PEPSI) was necessary to separate the expected tiny spectral-line absorptions of the Earth’s atmosphere from the normal solar spectrum at unprecedented spectral resolution and in polarized light. The radial velocities trace a wavelength dependent Rossiter-McLaughlin effect of the Earth eclipsing the Sun as seen from the Tycho crater confirming earlier observations. No line polarization of any spectral-line feature is detected outside nor inside eclipse. This places an upper limit of ≈0.2% on the degree of line polarization during transmission through Earth’s atmosphere and magnetosphere.

Read more: Strassmeier et al., 2020, A&A, accepted, in arXiv

AIP press release
LBT press release